Why Should You Visit Sultan Mosque?

When it comes to magnificent landmarks, few are as awe-inspiring as the Sultan Mosque in Singapore's Kampong Glam district. This Islamic place of worship has been standing proud since 1824 when it was built by the first-ever Sultan of Singapore, Hussain Shah. And what a building it is!

As you approach the mosque, you'll notice the impressive series of giant golden domes towering over the main prayer hall. It's a sight that is nothing short of breathtaking. But it's not just the impressive architecture that makes the Sultan Mosque worth a visit. The outside of the building is adorned in vibrant pastel shades of orange, cream, and green, which helps it shine even brighter in the strong Singaporean sun.

Visiting the Sultan Mosque is not just an opportunity to marvel at the impressive architecture and learn about the Islamic faith. It's also a chance to immerse yourself in Singapore's multicultural heritage. As the heart of the city's Arabic Quarter, the Sultan Mosque is surrounded by vibrant streets filled with colourful murals, chic cafes, and quaint shops.

Whether you're a history buff, architecture enthusiast, or just someone looking for a unique cultural experience, a visit to the Sultan Mosque should be at the top of your list when in Singapore.

About Sultan Mosque Singapore

History
History

The Sultan Mosque, located in Kampong Glam, Singapore, is a magnificent landmark with a rich history dating back to the early 19th century. It was built in 1824 by Sultan Hussein Shah, the first ever Sultan of Singapore, at the request of Stamford Raffles of the British East India Company. The original mosque was a single-storey building with a double-tiered roof and was later expanded due to the need for repairs. The construction of a new and larger mosque was proposed in 1924, which was built in phases and completed in 1932.

The mosque has undergone several renovations, including a major facelift in 2014 under the Mosque Upgrading Programme led by the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS). Due to its historical and cultural significance, the mosque was gazetted as a national monument in 1975. Today, the Sultan Mosque remains a significant landmark in Singapore, attracting visitors from around the world to admire its impressive architecture and learn about its rich history.

Architecture and Furnishings
Architecture and Furnishings

Sultan Mosque is an impressive example of Islamic architecture located in Kampong Glam, Singapore. The mosque features a blend of traditional Islamic and European architectural styles, with its main prayer hall boasting intricate details, such as stained-glass windows, ornate plasterwork, and intricate geometric patterns adorning the walls and ceiling. The exterior of the mosque is equally impressive, with its four large golden domes towering above the surrounding buildings, and the colorful pastel shades of orange, cream, and green creating a striking contrast against the blue sky.

One of the most distinctive features of the mosque is its minaret, a slender tower rising high above the surrounding buildings, with a balcony at the top offering a panoramic view of the area. The mosque also features an annex building, built in 1993, which seamlessly blends in with the main mosque and offers additional space for worshippers and community events. With its unique blend of architectural styles and impressive attention to detail, Sultan Mosque is a must-visit attraction for anyone interested in Islamic architecture and history.

Events and Activities
Events and Activities

The Sultan Mosque in Singapore's Kampong Glam district is not just a stunning architectural masterpiece, but it's also steeped in history. This iconic Islamic place of worship has played an important role in many significant events over the years. For instance, in January 1937, the Malay Regiment made their first public appearance in a march to Sultan Mosque to attend prayers. This momentous occasion was observed by the sultans of Perak and Trengganu and Governor Shenton Thomas.

However, the mosque also found itself at the center of racial riots in 1950. Due to its location in Kampong Glam, it was caught up in the unrest sparked by the Maria Hertogh case. The mosque played a role in dispersing rioters who hid inside its walls.

Today, the Sultan Mosque continues to be an important focal point for religious, cultural, and social activities. During Ramadan, a popular night market with numerous food stalls springs up in the vicinity of the mosque, where Muslims gather to await the prayer call to break their fast at sunset. The mosque also conducts social outreach programs and charity work, including food distribution and blood donation drives.

But the Sultan Mosque isn't just for Muslims. It welcomes a stream of tourists, many of whom are non-Muslim, who are fascinated by its rich history and stunning architecture. So, whether you're interested in religion, history, or simply want to marvel at a beautiful building, a visit to the Sultan Mosque is a must.

Major Highlight of Sultan Mosque Singapore
Major Highlight of Sultan Mosque Singapore
  • Sultan Mosque, also known as Masjid Sultan, is a magnificent landmark located in Kampong Glam, Singapore's 'Arabic Quarter'.
  • It was built in 1824 by Sultan Hussian Shah, the first ever Sultan of Singapore.
  • The mosque has a series of giant golden domes topping off the main prayer hall, and the exterior is adorned in vibrant pastel shades of orange, cream and green.
  • In January 1937, the Malay Regiment made its first public appearance in a march from Victoria Theatre to Sultan Mosque to attend prayers, which was observed by sultans and the Governor of Singapore.
  • In 1950, the mosque found itself at the center of racial riots sparked by the Maria Hertogh case.
  • The mosque has been an important focal point for religious, cultural and social activities over the years, and hosts a popular night market with numerous food stalls during Ramadan.
  • The mosque is also involved in charity work such as food distribution and blood donation drives, and conducts social outreach programs.
  • The mosque welcomes a stream of tourists, many of whom are non-Muslim and some staff members have even taken up foreign languages to communicate effectively with them.

Know Before You Visit Sultan Mosque

How to Reach?
Best Time to Visit
Tips to Visit
How to Reach?

Sultan Mosque is located at 3 Muscat Street, Singapore 198833, in the Kampong Glam neighborhood. Here are some of the ways to reach the mosque:

  • By MRT: The nearest MRT station is Bugis MRT (EW12/DT14), which is a 10-minute walk away. From the station, head towards the Bugis Junction mall and continue straight down Victoria Street until you reach Sultan Mosque.
  • By Bus: There are several bus routes that stop near Sultan Mosque, including numbers 48, 57, 100, 107, 107M, and 961.
  • By Car: If you're driving, there is limited parking available in the vicinity of the mosque. There are public car parks nearby, such as at Golden Landmark Shopping Centre and the multi-storey car park at Sultan Plaza.
  • By Taxi/ Ride-hailing apps: You can also take a taxi or ride-hailing service to Sultan Mosque. Just input the mosque's address in the app and the driver will drop you off at the nearest available spot.

Once you arrive at Sultan Mosque, you can take a guided tour of the mosque or explore the Kampong Glam neighborhood on foot to discover its rich history and culture.

FAQ's of Sultan Mosque

What kind of events and ceremonies take place at the mosque throughout the year?

    The Sultan Mosque is an active mosque that hosts several events and ceremonies throughout the year. Some of the major events include:

    • Ramadan: During the Muslim month of fasting, Ramadan, the Sultan Mosque hosts a variety of activities including Quranic recitations, nightly prayers, and food bazaars.
    • Eid al-Fitr: The mosque celebrates Eid al-Fitr, the festival marking the end of Ramadan, with a special morning prayer and sermon.
    • Hajj: The mosque offers special prayers and sermons during the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, known as Hajj.
    • Islamic New Year: The Islamic New Year is marked by special prayers and sermons at the mosque.
    • Friday Prayers: Friday prayers, known as Jumu'ah, are held at the mosque every week and are attended by a large number of worshippers.

    Apart from these events, the mosque also hosts weddings and other religious ceremonies. It is important to note that non-Muslim visitors are welcome to visit the mosque but should dress modestly and remove their shoes before entering the prayer hall.

What other nearby attractions are worth seeing in the area around the mosque?

What is the best time of day to visit Sultan Mosque?

How long does the average visit to the mosque typically last?

What are some of the unique architectural features of the mosque?

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